Can Cars Be ‘Investments’? We Reveal The Best Car Investments In 21/22

Surely it’s the dream scenario for any petrolhead? You buy a car you love and watch it go up in value every year rather than lose a bunch of cash as soon as you leave the dealer’s forecourt. But, can cars really be investments? In this list we reveal the best car investments that should get you some bang for your buck.

We’re focusing on big-engined coupes here. With petrol and diesel due to be ruled out for new cars in 2030, a thumping V8 will suddenly seem even more appealing. So, check out the list below before you go and scour the used cars for sale – and make sure you’re not getting ripped off! Check what the car is valued at before you buy (you can use online valuation tools to check this).

Jaguar XKR (X150)

With the once relatively affordable E-Type now fetching big money, a slinky Jaguar seems a pretty good bet. The XKR is about as cheap as it’ll get and was well received back in the day. A blend of decent comfort and pleasing handling is backed up by a supercharged V8 with 420hp in early cars or 503hp in post 2009 facelift cars.

BMW M3 (E92)

The first generation E30 BMW M3 is a racing legend, and while the E92 we’re looking at here doesn’t have the same motorsport pedigree, it is the only M3 to be fitted with a V8 engine. It’s a cracker, too, with over 400hp, an 8300rpm redline and an intoxicating exhaust note. If you’re not a fan of two-door coupes, there’s also a four-door saloon and a convertible version.

Vauxhall Monaro

Ignore the badge, this is a far cry from the family hatchback you’d expect from Vauxhall. That’s probably because it’s actually a rebadged Holden, GM’s Australian arm and therefore gets a big V8, rear-wheel drive and bags of character. It’s not as sophisticated as the European offerings in this list, but it’s huge fun and has a cult following.

Audi RS 5

The original Audi Quattro proves how desirable a high performance two-door coupe with four rings on its nose can be, and the RS 5 is its modern counterpart. With a 4.2-litre V8 channelling power to all four wheels, it’s far faster than its ancestor and will be fast whatever the weather. It’s not the most exciting option on this list to drive, but it’s arguably the easiest to live with day to day,

Maserati 4200

If the Maserati 4200’s styling wasn’t reason enough to make it an incredibly desirable thing, it’s worth pointing out that under the bonnet is a Ferrari developed V8. Like the XKR it’s relatively comfortable, if not the sharpest handling thing out there while the leather lined interior feels pleasingly opulent. It’s even far more reliable than you might think, although it’s still worth spending extra on a well looked after example.

Mercedes-Benz CL (C216)

Don’t be fooled by the name, the CL is effectively a two-door S-Class coupe. That means it’s a luxury cruiser rather than a corner carver, although that doesn’t mean it’s slow. The V8 CL 500 is the sensible choice, with the AMG tuned CL63 providing a faster and slightly sharper alternative. The V12 models are complete overkill and should only be approached with an exceedingly full bank account.

Porsche 928

Despite being launched in the 70s, the 928 had a long life, being sold well into the 90s. It grew ever faster and more capable during its lifetime, but all have a bellowing V8 engine mounted up front and distinctive looks both inside and out. As shown by most being automatics, this is a big GT rather than an out and out sports car so don’t expect it to be the most agile thing in this list.

Lexus SC430

Although it won’t win any beauty contests, the SC430 has a lot going for it. There’s a smooth, powerful yet reliable engine under the bonnet and a folding metal roof that means you’re sorted come rain or shine. Early cars weren’t particularly comfortable, but post 2004 facelifted cars were greatly improved.

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